Image from page 287 of “India impressions, with some notes of Ceylon during a winter tour, 1906-7 [microform]” (1907)

By | May 31, 2018

Some cool women wear scarf images:

Image from page 287 of “India impressions, with some notes of Ceylon during a winter tour, 1906-7 [microform]” (1907)
women wear scarf
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Identifier: indiaimpressions00cranrich
Title: India impressions, with some notes of Ceylon during a winter tour, 1906-7 [microform]
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Crane, Walter, 1845-1915
Subjects: India — Description and travel Sri Lanka — Description and travel
Publisher: London : Methuen & Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ossessions as todress distinctions between the sexes, might havesome difficulty in saying which was which, or whowas who, especially as the native women frequentlywore similar skirts, white bodices, and their hairin knots. It was chiefly the beards that betrayedthe gentlemen ; otherwise the equality of thesexes was fairly well established, as to outwardappearance at least, in the way that might astonishsome of our Western reformers. It is true someof the men, like the ancient Egyptians, wore nothingabove the skirt, except perhaps a white scarf onthe shoulders, and the field-workers and cooliesall down the Coromandel coast wore nothing butwhite turbans and waist cloths. We passed the Silver Lake, really an inlet of thesea nearly surrounded by hills, the train startlinglarge flocks of brown geese from the margin as itpassed. Our old friends the white cranes we saw MADRAS AND THE SOUTH 243 again lower down the line among the marshy pools.Paddy fields in various stages, often under water,

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LADTES OR GENTLEMEN ? (FASHIONS IN SOUTHERN INDIA) irrigation wells drawn by oxen, as well as anotherpattern—like the Hungarian or Egyptian, a walking-beam weighted at one end, the other having a ropeattached to the bucket. The Southern Indian 244 INDIA IMPRESSIONS ones are, however, worked by the natives, generallytwo, working up and down from the centre, fromwhich the beam swings, making it dip and riseagain with bucket, the men steadying themselvesby upright bamboos fixed each side, sometimeschanting a sone to mark the time and enable themto move together. Groves of palms were passed and pyramidalhills, bringing the same suggestion of Egyptwe had had before, on the way to Chitorgarh.There was no doubt about getting further south asthe temperature was much higher, the thermometerregistering 75° to 8o° and this was February 4,whereas only two days before we had been shiver-ing over a fire at Darjeeling ! In the burning sun wecould see the dark figures in white turbans andwaist cl

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Image from page 69 of “The town of Roxbury: its memorable persons and places, its history and antiquities, with numerous illustrations of its old landmarks and noted personages” (1878)
women wear scarf
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Identifier: townofroxburyits00drak
Title: The town of Roxbury: its memorable persons and places, its history and antiquities, with numerous illustrations of its old landmarks and noted personages
Year: 1878 (1870s)
Authors: Drake, Francis S. (Francis Samuel), 1828-1885
Subjects: Roxbury (Boston, Mass.) — History
Publisher: Roxbury, : The Author
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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ze of a half-dollar; vests also with-out collars, but very long, having graceful, pendulous lappetpockets ; shirts with bosoms and wrist-ruffles, and with goldor silver buckles at the wrist united by a link : the neckclothor scarf of fine linen or figured stuff or embroidered, theends hanging loosely. The smallclothes reached below theknees, where they were ornamented with silver buckles ofliberal size ; the legs were covered with gray stockings, andthe feet with shoes ornamented with straps and silver buckles. Square-toed shoes kept their footing from 1689 to 1737.when the round or peaked toe, originally worn by our emi-grant ancestors, came again into fashion. A stricture on thedress of the ladies in 1732 speaks of k- shoe-toes pointed tothe heavens, in imitation of the Laplanders, with buckles ofa harness size. As early as 1689 ladies wore dress shoesof silk and satin, richly embroidered. In 1716 laced shoesfor women and children are advertised in a Boston paper. 54 DRESS OF WOMEN.

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A CAVALIER. Until 1714 the heels were worn very high. Soon after thesettlement, the fashionables of both sexes had large knots or roses of ribbon, generally green, on theinstep of their shoes. Boots were sel-dom worn except by military men. In1C.31 any person not worth £200, wear-ing great boots, was subject to a fine.They were as large at the top as thebrim of a hat. and our thrifty sires veryproperly objected to such a waste ofleather. Buskins, a kind of half-boot,worn two centuries ago, are mentionedin the inventory of Thomas Lamb, ofRoxburv. The usual mode of wearing the hairwas in the close-cropped fashion of theRoundheads: but there were alwaysthose who wore their hair long as a matter of taste, indefiance of the straitlaced brethren. A law against this•• feminine protexity was passed as early as 1049, and wasstrenuously advocated by the apostle Eliot. The simple costume of our Puritan mothers was a cheapstraw bonnet, with only one bow without, and •• no ornamentbut the

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