Champaign-Urbana Critical Mass

By | May 19, 2018

Some cool women wear scarf images:

Champaign-Urbana Critical Mass
women wear scarf
Image by kidmissile
My first Critical Mass ride on Friday 09/26/2006.

I took some hurried shots at the beginning of the ride. I didn’t get a chance to take any during the ride. I think at one point someone said the count was 54 people riding.

It’s hard to tell, but if you look closely, you can see that the woman in the left foreground wearing the scarf was riding a double-decker. It was a sweet bike. She got a lot of attention from cars during the ride.

Image from page 271 of “A history of hand-made lace : dealing with the origin of lace, the growth of the great lace centres, the mode of manufacture, the methods of distinguishing and the care of various kinds of lace” (1900)
women wear scarf
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: historyofhandmad1900jack
Title: A history of hand-made lace : dealing with the origin of lace, the growth of the great lace centres, the mode of manufacture, the methods of distinguishing and the care of various kinds of lace
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Jackson, Emily, 1861-
Subjects: Lace and lace making
Publisher: London : L. Upcott Gill New York : C. Scribner’s Sons
Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:

Text Appearing After Image:
An Eighteenth Century Sampler. but also to show the skill of the worker. Representations in coloured silks ofelaborate borders, lettering, animals, figures, insects and buildings are frequentlyto be met with in a good state of preservation. Scarf.—A long straight length of lace to wear round the throat, waist, orshoulders, finished all round with a border. Seme.—A French term for sewn or powdered designs of dots, tears or sprigs. Setting Sticks.—Tools of wood or bone, formerly used in starching andfluting ruffs. Smock—(i) A linen shirt worn by men or women, frequently ornamentedwith embroidery or cut-work. (2) The old English term for shift, shirt, orchemise. Spines.—Long straight points used to enrich raised cordonnets. Sprig.—A term used to denote a detached piece of lace which is afterwardsapplique on to a net foundation, or joined with bars so as to form, with othersprigs, a compact material. Star Ground.—A variety of Ground, mentioned under that heading. Starch.—A

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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